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KT Corner

Knowledge transfer (KT) is now part of the normal research cycle and aims at facilitating the adoption of evidence-informed practices and public policies. This section is designed to help researchers meet this new challenge by providing background material about KT and by monitoring relevant public policy news. It also features various relevant outputs in the form of webcasts, powerpoint presentations, opeds and analyses by CRDCN researchers discussing recent social, economic and health issues and research findings.

Public Policy News

Violence against young women and girls: call for briefs

The House of Commons Standing Committee on the Status of Women invites the public to submit written briefs for the Committee’s study on violence against young women and girls in Canada. The deadline is September 23, 2016. For more details, read the news release.

27 June 2016 - 11:47am |

Refugees Welcome Here: Awareness, Advocacy and Action

The Canadian Council for Refugees is hosting its spring Consultation on June 2 to 4, in Saskatoon, with the participation of the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, John McCallum. The consultation will bring together over 300 people from across Canada and beyond and offer key opportunities for information exchange, networking, and strategy development. Discussions will address issues that challenge refugees, immigrants, advocates and community workers. To know more and register, click here.

5 May 2016 - 4:19pm |

Canada's Number 1 Numbers Man

Last Sunday, the Sunday Edition of CBC Radio One featured an interview with Wayne R. Smith, Chief Statistician of Canada. The 25-minute interview with host Michael Enright is available here.

5 April 2016 - 11:05am |

About Knowledge Transfer

Reflections and discussions about KT and the impact of social sciences on society are not new, but they have become much more common place over the last 10 to 15 years due to a number of factors, including a changing governance structure, a growing focus on evidence-based policy and decision-making, and the requirements of granting agencies here and abroad. Nevertheless, KT remains somewhat of an unknown for a good many researchers. This table provides background resources to better understand “what” it is, “how” to do it, and “where” to do it. We also list relevant Canadian and foreign websites.

What

  • Graham, Ian D.; Jo Logan; Margaret B. Harrison; Sharon E. Straus; Jacqueline Tetroe; Wenda Caswell; and Nicole Robinson. 2006. “Lost in Knowledge Translation: Time for a Map?,” The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, Volume 26, Number 1, pp. 13–24.
  • Gluckman, Sir Peter. 2011. “Towards Better Use of Evidence in Policy Formation: A Discussion Paper,” Office of the Prime minister’s science advisory committee, New Zealand.
  • Tetroe, Jacqueline. 2007. “Knowledge Translation at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research: A Primer,” Focus, Technical brief no. 18.

How

Where 

  • Health Reports A peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research published by the Health Analysis Division of Statistics Canada. It is available online each month and in print on a quarterly basis. It is designed for a broad audience including health professionals, researchers, policymakers and the general public. Submissions should be of wide interest and contain original and timely analyses of national or provincial-territorial surveys or administrative databases.
  • Policy Options A bilingual magazine published 10 times per year by the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP).  Its goal is to encourage an informed debate on the important public policy issues of the day. Articles (between 1,500 and 4,000 words) are written for an educated (though not necessarily specialist) readership. Contributors are encouraged to avoid submissions with excessive discipline-specific jargon and theory.
  • Canadian Public Policy An interdisciplinary journal, published quarterly, that aims to stimulate research and discussion of economic and social public policy problems in Canada. Articles (under 7000 words) may be submitted in English or French. They should be policy-relevant, of a high intellectual standard and comprehensible to readers outside the author's own discipline.
  • The Monitor Amonthly journal sent free to all members of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). A limited selection of articles are available on-line.

Interesting websites

  • The Canadian Knowledge Transfer and Exchange Community of Practice (KTECOP) is a Canadian network of practitioners and researchers who share knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) practices and experience, build peer relationships for information exchange and support, build KTE capacity, advance knowledge of KTE effectiveness, and share KTE events, job opportunities and other related KTE activities.
  • The Campbell Collaboration is an international research network that aims to help people make well-informed decisions by preparing, maintaining and disseminating systematic reviews in education, crime and justice, and social welfare. It is based on voluntary cooperation among researchers of a variety of backgrounds.
  • Informed Opinions is working to amplify women’s voices and build their leadership capacity. The project trains and supports women in making their ideas more accessible and increasing their impact. Its goals are to bridge the gender gap in public commentary and enhance the quality of public discourse by expanding the diversity of perspectives that inform Canada’s policies and priorities.
  • The Evidence Network of Canadian Health Policy, commonly known as EvidenceNetwork.ca is a non-partisan web-based project funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Manitoba Health Research Council to make the latest evidence on controversial health policy issues available to the media. It aims to link journalists with health policy experts to provide access to credible, evidence-based information.
  • Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement List a series of 18 articles describing processes for ensuring that relevant research is identified, appraised and used to inform decisions about health policies and programs. The tools were written for people responsible for health policy decision-making (e.g., health system managers and policy-makers) and for those who support them.
  • Research Impact is a knowledge mobilization network involving the several Canadian universities: York, Victoria, Guelph, Memorial, Saskatchewan and UQÀM. It is designed to connect university researchers with policy-makers and community organizations seeking research to inform decision-making and develop sustainable solutions to social, environmental, economic and cultural challenges.
  • The Knowledge Mobilization Institute is a non-profit Corporation focused on: education, learning and capacity development on issues of knowledge mobilization; collaboration and community engagement; applied research and policy support; and evaluation and monitoring.
  • The Impact of Social Sciences is a blog run by the LSE Public Policy Group to help maximize the impact of academic work in the social sciences, be encouraging debate, sharing best practices and keeping the impact community up to date with recent news, events and debate.